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Algorithms & Programming

Algorithms & Programming is...

Algorithms are sets of instructions. We use instructions every day to get things done. A chef follows a recipe to make her favourite dish; the recipe is an algorithm. A pupil may follow a set of instructions to carry out a science experiment in school, those instructions are an algorithm. 

Programming is the implementation of algorithms. We learn to write computer programs so that computers can follow our instructions to behave intelligently, Add a little creativity to programming and it often results in innovation. 

The workshops that fall under this category all have an element of programming, or at the very least algorithmic thinking within them. Pupils are taught to solve problems by writing and implementing their own algorithms, through dance and magic and more.

App in a Day: An Apps for Good Taster Workshop

“Apps have been changing the way people communicate, work and play. Traditional businesses, from media to retail, have been seeing their business models disrupted by start-ups that amass millions of users within the space of a few months with minimal marketing budgets.” (Vision Mobile, 2014) Apps have become an important part of our digital world today and the industry attracts developers and designers from across all age groups, from teenagers to 65+.

Beautiful Numbers: Mathematical Art

This workshop draws the link between Mathematics, Art and Computing and has been adapted from the workshop materials produced at Langley Grammar School. We look at the Fibonacci number sequence and the concept of the Golden Ratio and discuss how this has been applied to art and design throughout the ages, as well as being present in nature. Pupils are encouraged to explore the Fibonacci number sequence and how it is constructed.

Funky Maths Calculator

This workshop addresses the concepts of simple algebraic equations and variables by teaching pupils to create their own calculator using the Scratch programming environment.

Get with the Algo-rhythm

The ‘Computing through Dance’ project was developed by the Digital Schoolhouse and Langley Grammar School’s ICT Department to appeal to girls and incorporate computing in an innovative way into the curriculum. The project starts by creating flow charts of instructions to perform dance moves of a well know dance like; the Hokey Cokey, the rugby team (New Zealand And Tonga) Haka, Michael Jackson Moon Walk or a Tudor dance which many children study in Key Stage 2. The initial objective is to develop the understanding of a sequence and appreciate the importance of accurate instructions.

Just Dance with the Algorithm

Just Dance with the Algorithm was developed by Digital Schoolhouse in partnership with Ubisoft, and is based upon the original workshop ‘Get with the Algo-rhythm’. This workshop combines dance and video games to teach core programming and computing concepts in a way that appeals to a diverse range of students. The workshop begins by creating flow charts of instructions to perform dance moves from popular music tracks.

Let's Doodle: What will you create?

This is a computing lesson with a difference. This cross-curricular workshop developed with 3Doodler involves no programming, but covers every strand of the Computational Thinking Framework and allows pupils to accelerate and work towards Key Stage 3 strands in the Programmes of Study. The new Design & Technology Programmes of Study are also partially covered at both Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3.

Let's Play Code Combat: Playing with Python

Code Combat is a multiplayer game to help people learn to program. Through solving puzzles and defeating ogres players progress through the game levels to learn increasingly complex programming concepts.

Let's Play Code Kingdoms

The orginal Code Kingdoms game reffered to in this pack is no longer active, however all principles used throughout this unit can be applied to other graphics-based learning environments. The Code Kingdoms developer is still active and can be used via:

Loopy Games: An Iterative Games Design Workshop

Loopy Games aims to help pupils design and create their own game using methodology that reflects the processes followed in the UK Games Industry. Developed in consultation and collaboration with Kuato Studios and the Video Games Ambassadors, this workshop brings industry expertise into the classroom.

Machine Code Mario

Machine Code Mario introduces students to binary in an innovative way. Starting with investigating why computers use binary, students explore how to represent decimal numbers in binary and then how to use this knowledge to create Super Mario courses using Super Mario Maker 2 that test the players understanding of binary representation. The design, exploration and development stages of the beginner workshop fit nicely into KS2.

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